University of Connecticut University of UC Title Fallback Connecticut

Course Descriptions & Placement Guidelines

As part of the University General Education Requirements, all students are required to complete ENGL 1010 or 1011. (Note: ENGL 1010 or 1011 is a prerequisite to all writing (W) courses.) Honors students passing ENGL 2011 (formerly ENGL 3800) will fulfill the General Education First-Year Writing requirement (ENGL 1010/1011) upon course completion.

Placement into First-Year Writing is based on a combination of standardized test scores and written placement exam. Because the SAT scoring has changed somewhat, please use this conversion prepared from the College Board Concordance tables.

The new SAT combines the Writing and Language section with the Critical Reading section for a combined score in the range of 200-800. The Writing and Language section has a range of 10-40, as does the Critical Reading section. Scores must reach the threshold for the section AND the combined score for placement.

New SAT Reading Test with Combined Reading & Writing Score of  Placement
26 or lower  470 ENGL 1004 Required
27 -28 480-580 ENGL 1004 Strongly Recommended
29 or higher 590 and above ENGL 1010 or 1011

 

New SAT Writing Test with Combined Reading and Writing Score of  Placement
26 or lower 470 ENGL 1004 Required
27-28 480-580 ENGL 1004 Strongly Recommended
29 or higher 590 and above ENGL 1010 or 1011

The final decision on placement occurs in the classroom during the first week of classes. If, upon reviewing a writing sample the instructor and a First-Year Writing Program administrator decide that you would benefit more from support, your placement may be revised and you will be asked to enroll in the designated course.

If you have not completed the SAT Critical Reading test, your advisor will suggest appropriate course work taking into account your previous schooling and, if applicable, any credits received in transfer.

Placement in ENGL 1003

All placement for ENGL 1003 is by written placement exam administered during Orientation.  Any student who misses the Orientation writing placement exam must arrange to take that exam at a mutually agreeable time after the Orientation placement exams are administered. The student will be given a different writing prompt from the one given during the group placement testing.

  • Multilingual Students who are transitioning to primarily English academic discourse;
  • Students who have been placed in the course by standardized test scores and written placement test.

The course provides students more experience writing extended essays for an American university audience. During the course, students will develop academic writing projects in response to work currently undertaken in the American university community.  Along with opportunities to write several original essays, students will become familiar with in-class writing and follow-up discussion; substantive engagement with texts; and collaborative work including peer review. The work in written, visual, and oral engagement will prepare students for future courses, including ENGL 1004, and the Seminars in Academic Writing (ENGL 1010 or ENGL 1011), as well as other University courses across the discplines. Primarily, the course helps students understand and work with the intellectual inquiry, contexts, audiences, genres, and conventions of writing for University. ENGL 1003 is not a language course. Any student who needs to improve basic English language skills should begin by taking courses with UCAELI. Students’ home languages are resources for discussing language and rhetoric in a global context.

Class size is limited to 15.

 ENGL 1003 may be repeated if desired or if the instructor recommends further study in ENGL 1003. Repeated course credit in ENGL 1003 counts as “elective” and toward total credits needed to graduate.  The course is open to undergraduate, graduate, and exchange students. 

The Transition from ENGL 1003 to First-Year Writing

Students enrolled in ENGL 1003 must successfully complete that course before attempting ENGL 1004 or other First-Year Writing courses; we do not recommend concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1003 and ENGL 1004.  The ENGL 1003 instructor will help students determine when they are comfortable with moving on to subsequent First-Year Writing courses. Students may be advised to remain in ENGL 1003 another term, or to register for ENGL 1004, ENGL 1010, or ENGL 1011.  While ENGL 1003 is open to graduate students by petition, ENGL 1004, ENGL 1010, and ENGL 1011 are open only to undergraduates.


Introduction to Academic Writing

English 1004 is designed to help students gain further experience with expectations of college-level writing in a supportive environment with extra feedback from instructors. This course is a mandatory prerequisite to English 1010/1011 for students who have been placed in it by written exam, or who have a verbal SAT score of 430 or below. Students with a verbal SAT between 440 and 540 are strongly encouraged to take ENGL 1004 by their advisor or if they feel they would benefit from additional writing experience prior to English 1010/1011. If students have been enrolled in ENGL 1003, the instructor will recommend subsequent placement into ENGL 1004.  English 1004 offers a smaller class size than English 1010/1011 (17 students instead of 22) and requires fifteen pages (approximately 4500 words) of revised, polished prose. Although texts and writing projects in English 1004 may resemble those of English 1010 or 1011, this work moves at a more gradual pace and in an environment that is especially supportive of students who may be unfamiliar with the conventions and processes of academic writing. After passing this class, students will be able to enroll in 1010 or 1011 to fulfill their General Education First-Year Writing requirement.

English 1010: Seminar in Academic Writing
English 1011: Seminar in Writing through Literature

Either English 1010 or 1011 will fulfill the First-Year Writing requirement at the University of Connecticut. Both are four-credit courses that are prerequisites for upper-level “W” courses at the University. English 1010 and 1011 and designed to introduce students to the work of the university; the skills students learn here should transfer to academic writing in any discipline: interpretation, argumentation, and reflection. Strength in writing comes from learning not only how to analyze and interpret assigned and researched texts but also how to edit and properly revise formal writing assignments. Students will be required to write 30 pages (approximately 9,000 words) of polished prose during the course of the semester, distributed across four to six essays, though there will also be other, shorter writing assignments. The courses also emphasize revision: there are separate, formal due dates for drafts, and all drafts are workshopped in writing group conferences with peers and/or individual conferences with the instructors.
The only difference between the courses is the instructors’ choice of texts.  English 1011 tends to work with “literary” texts (novels, plays, short stories, poetry, etc.) while 1010 emphasizes “interdisciplinary” texts (mostly essays or other nonfiction). However, instructors have wide latitude in text selection, and many will mix texts of multiple types.

Full Descriptions