WAT Curriculum

Courses developed under the Writing Across Technology curriculum are project-based inquiries, collaboratively explored between both instructors and students throughout the semester. They center multimodal composition and universal design, and seek to make apparent that all writing is multimodal.

There are three main aspects to the Writing Across Technology curriculum: our WAT learning objectives, course moves, and architecture. Click the headings above to learn more about our course moves.

There are five writing moves that First-Year Writing courses ask students to make throughout the semester, both during in-class activities and through writing assignments. These moves are: collecting and curating, engaging and entering a conversation, contextualizing, theorizing, and circulating. Assignments in First-Year Writing courses using the WAT Curriculum are designed around one or more of these moves, and students practice all of them by the end of the course.

Over the course of the semester, our proposed architecture provides a potential sequence for scaffolding assignments on one another by imagining the ways our students can situate themselves within our course inquiries. There are three, overlapping and scaffolding arcs: grounding, connecting, and opening outward.

Each move and each arc has been designed to help achieve First-Year Writing’s learning objectives. Each is also associated with certain information literacy threshold concepts and habits of mind that are components of First-Year Writing courses. The description of each move outlines these elements and also includes brief examples of the kinds of assignments that could be designed around each move, and our architecture provides a brief overview of how assignments might scaffold on one another.

To build a course through the WAT Curriculum and for further materials, please visit our WAT Course Development Tool.

 

The Writing Across Technology Curriculum has been developed by Lisa Blansett, Reme Bohlin, Brenda Brueggemann, Alex Gatten, and Gabriel Morrison.